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Postal Pointers: Forever stamps honor America’s industrial workers

August 28, 2013
By KATHLEEN SWANSON , Lehigh Acres Citizen

The contributions of America's industrial-era workers are memorialized on a new sheet of Forever stamps titled "Made in America: Building a Nation." The stamps, which feature black-and-white photographs of industrial workers, were dedicated at the Department of Labor by Postmaster General Patrick R. Donahoe.

"With Labor Day around the corner, the Postal Service is proud to honor the men and women who helped build this country with their own hands," Donahoe said. "They mined the coal that warmed our homes. They made the clothes we wore on our backs. Let each stamp serve as a small reminder of the dedication, work ethic, and sacrifices that make America great."

Joining Donahoe at the ceremony was recently-appointed Secretary of the U.S. Department of Labor Tom Perez and Secretary-Treasurer of the AFL-CIO Elizabeth Shuler.

Article Photos

PHOTO?SPECIAL?TO THE CITIZEN
“Made in America: Building a Nation” Forever stamps.

The pane features 12 stamps, each showing a different man or woman hard at work. In the top row are an airplane maker; a derrick worker on the Empire State Building; a millinery apprentice; and a laborer on a hoisting ball on the Empire State Building.

In the middle row are a linotyper in a publishing house; a welder on the Empire State Building; a coal miner; and riveters on the Empire State Building.

In the bottom row are a powerhouse mechanic; a railroad track walker; a textile worker; and a crew member guiding a beam on the Empire State Building.

Eleven of the stamp images were taken by photographer Lewis Hine, who is famous for his work which helped tell the story of early 20th-century laborers.

There are five stamp sheets available, each with a different photo in the selvage area, or area outside the stamps, on the sheet.

The coal miner appears again on a selvage, along with three additional Lewis Hine photos. A Margaret Bourke-White photo of a female welder is also featured.

Kathleen Swanson is a spokeswoman for U.S. Postal Service.

 
 

 

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