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Postal News: Living recipients on the Korean War Medal of Honor Forever stamp sheet

August 13, 2014
By PHIL WIEBOLD , Lehigh Acres Citizen

The U.S. Postal Service has issued the Korean War Medal of Honor Forever stamps - paying tribute to 145 American veterans who received the nation's highest military honor for personal acts of valor above and beyond the call of duty during the Korean War.

Florida Medal of Honor recipients Hector A. Cafferata Jr., of Venice, and William R. Charette, of Lake Wales, are honored on the postal service's Korean War Medal of Honor Prestige Folio.

Their photos appear outside the stamps on the stamp sheet.

Customers may purchase the stamps at post offices nationwide, on: usps.com/stamps, at (800) STAMP24 (782-6724) or at: ebay.com/stamps. They are available as a set of 20 stamps.

A dedication ceremony took place on July 26 at the Arlington National Cemetery's amphitheater, where one of the living Korean War recipients, Thomas Jerome Hudner Jr. of Concord, Massachusetts, and family members of other recipients depicted participated.

The Medal of Honor, the nation's highest award for valor in combat, is presented "for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty."

In January 2012, the U.S. Postal Service invited the last living recipients of the award from the Korean War to join in honoring the extraordinary courage of every individual who received the Medal of Honor for his actions during the war.

Historic photos of the men surround two stamps on the first page of the folio. One stamp features a photograph of the Navy version of the Medal of Honor; the other stamp features a photograph of the Army version of the award.

The second page consists of a short piece of text and a key to the names of the recipients in the cover photos. The third page lists the names of all 145 recipients of the Medal of Honor.

The remaining 18 stamps are found on the back page, along with a quote describing why the Medal of Honor is awarded, "For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life, above and beyond the call of duty."

View many of the stamps at facebook.com/USPSStamps, Twitter@USPSstamps, pinterest.com/uspsstamps, instagram.com/uspostalservice or on: uspsstamps.com.

Phil Wiebold is a spokeswoman for U.S. Postal Service.

 
 

 

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